How Health Services Research can Ensure Rehabilitation Aligns With the Objectives of Healthcare Reform #2822

INSTRUCTIONAL COURSE DETAIL

TUE, 26 OCT: 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM

FACULTY

Anne Deutsch, PhD
Senior Research Public Health Analyst at RTI International, a Clinical Research Scientist at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago’s Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research and is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and the Institute for Healthcare Studies.

Pamela Roberts, PhD, MSHA, OTR/L, SCFES, FAOTA, CPHQ, FNAP
Program Director of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Neuropsychology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California.

Natalie E. Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA
Assistant professor with joint faculty appointments in the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy (OSOT) and the USC Davis School of Gerontology.

Trudy Mallinson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA
Associate Professor in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at the George Washington University, with appointments in the Office for Clinical Practice Innovation and the Department of Clinical Research and Leadership.

Nancy Flinn, PhD, OTR/L
Director of Outcomes and Research at Courage Center, a community based rehabilitation and resource center focused on social participation.

Tim Reistetter, PhD, OTR
Associate professor in the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston.

Jason Beneciuk, PT, DPT, PhD, MPH, FAAOMPT
Research assistant professor with joint positions with Brooks Rehabilitation Clinical Research Center and the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Florida.

James Graham, PhD
Associate professor in the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences within the School of Health Professions and a Fellow in the Sealy Center on Aging at UTMB.

Barbara Gage, PhD
Sr. VP, Scientific Research and Development, Post Acute Care Center for Research, Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at the Brookings Institute.

DIAGNOSIS

Other, DIAGNOSIS-Independent

Health Services Research

FOCUS

Training/instruction in new knowledge/skills (attendees will develop new competencies that can be applied in practice or research)

 

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Policy makers, payers, and healthcare administrators are relying on population-based health services research to inform policy and decisions about service delivery.  To this end, the objective of this course is to elucidate how health services research can inform rehabilitation research, clinical innovation, quality improvement, and health policy.  This panel discussion will describe the concept of population-based health services research using large databases, provide examples pertinent to rehabilitation, and draw on small group activities to facilitate the application to clinical practice.

 

ABSTRACT BODY

The overarching goal of healthcare reform is the provision of high quality and efficient care that results in desired patient outcomes, referred to as the National Quality Strategy. To this end, policymakers are relying on population-based health services research (HSR) to inform policy decisions.  HSR examines the organization, delivery, and finance of healthcare services from the perspective of the various stakeholders (e.g. policy makers, administrators, patients, clinicians) in an effort to improve efficacy, quality and outcomes of care.

Rehabilitation professionals can make vital contributions to HSR in the context of healthcare reform and clinical practice.  But few studies examine rehabilitation services from a population perspective.  Understanding HSR methodology provides a framework for rehabilitation professionals to examine service delivery from a population perspective.

Building on their own experience and the use of HSR in other disciplines, this instructional course will describe health services research, provide examples of rehabilitation HSR questions in multiple settings, and share resources to support HSR focused on rehablitation.  Each speaker will provide examples of how HSR can be used to address rehabilitation relevant research questions.  This course will also elucidate how HSR can inform clinical practice and innovation to improve the quality of care and characterize population-based patient outcomes.  Session partcipants will (1) reflect on how population-based HSR can be used to move rehabilitation perspectives forward in the policy and decision-making arena and (2) formulate and discuss possible questions that are relevant to their practice settings that could be addressed through HSR.

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

  1. Define health services research
  2. Understand the types of research questions that can be answered utilizing a health services research approach and resources to support health services research
  3. Identify how health services research can inform quality improvement and clinical innovation
  4. Increase awareness of the strengths and barriers of using health services research to inform policy and service delivery

 

INTENDED TARGET AUDIENCE

Researchers, Clinicians, Health policy

BIO SKETCHES

Anne Deutsch, PhD is a Senior Research Public Health Analyst at RTI International, a Clinical Research Scientist at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago’s Center for Rehabilitation Outcomes Research and is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and the Institute for Healthcare Studies. Her research focuses on measurement of functional status, post-acute care Medicare payment policy, and health care quality. Anne is a certified rehabilitation registered nurse with a doctoral degree in Epidemiology and Community Health. Anne is a member of the Board of Governors for the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine.

Pamela Roberts, PhD, MSHA, OTR/L, SCFES, FAOTA, CPHQ, FNAP is the Program Director for Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Neuropsychology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California. Dr. Roberts has worked throughout the continuum of care as a clinician, administrator and researcher. She also teaches at the University of Southern California, and guest lectures at other local universities, a national FIM trainer and consultant for Uniform Data System in Buffalo, New York, and a CARF surveyor for CARF…Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitation Facilities. She is involved in the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine-Stroke Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group, American Occupational Therapy Association, Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education, the American Medical Rehabilitation Providers Association Quality Committee, National Quality Forum Measures Application Partnership Post-Acute Care/Long-Term Care Workgroup member, past chair of the California Hospital Association Center for Medical Rehabilitation Services, and currently serves on the California Hospital Association Post Acute Care board. Dr. Roberts has served as principal and co-investigator on a variety of research projects including recent 2013 and 2014 publications on readmissions in PMR and AJOT journals. Additionally, Dr. Roberts has provided a variety of workshops and consultations on rehabilitation topics regionally, nationally, and internationally.

Natalie E. Leland, PhD, OTR/L, BCG, FAOTA has joint faculty appointments in the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy (OSOT) and the USC Davis School of Gerontology. She is a nationally recognized researcher in gerontology with a focus improving post-acute care services for older adults. Dr. Leland has extensive geriatric clinical experience in a variety of rehabilitation settings. She D holds leadership positions both within occupational therapy and within the broader discipline of gerontology. She has received international attention for her work on falls among new-admitted nursing home patients. She is expert in the use of large, administrative datasets, longitudinal data analysis, and geographic variation in rehabilitation services. Her recent scholarship includes the AOTA Clinical Guidelines for productive aging and trends in access and outcomes of PAC for patients post-hip fracture. Her research shows an ongoing commitment to understanding and improving rehabilitation quality for older adults, with a particular interest in improving fall prevention. Dr. Leland is an expert in evaluating the impact of services on quality of care for older adults.

Trudy Mallinson, PhD, OTR/L, FAOTA is a Associate Professor in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at the George Washington University, with appointments in the Office for Clinical Practice Innovation and the Department of Clinical Research and Leadership. Her research interests include both rehabilitation outcomes and health policy research. Dr. Mallinson is a nationally recognized expert in developing and refining instruments (surveys and assessments) that measure health care outcomes. Dr. Mallinson has been co-investigator on several NIDRR-sponsored projects including a DRRP on Health Services Research and an RRTC on Measuring Rehabilitation Outcomes. The equating procedure she and colleagues developed during that program of research is currently used by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) to facilitate their in-house post-acute policy analyses. Integrating her experience as an occupational therapist, Rasch methodologist, and health services researcher, she has served on multiple CMS (Medicare) research projects aimed at enhancing care for individuals with disability including development a single patient assessment tool for post-acute care (the Continuity Assessment Record and Evaluation—CARE); participated in the post-acute care payment reform demonstration project; and consulted on the outpatient therapy payment alternatives project.

Nancy Flinn PhD, OTR/L is the Director of Outcomes and Research at Courage Center, a community-based rehabilitation and resource center focused on social participation. Dr. Flinn has a long history of occupational therapy practice and research in physical rehabilitation across settings. Dr. Flinn became acutely aware of the contexts of disability and poverty, and the constraints that they place on the lives of individuals with disability. Dr. Flinn brings knowledge of disability and its social context to her work in developing, implementing, and evaluating an expanded primary care clinic for individuals with disabilities and complex health conditions.

Tim Reistetter, PhD, OTR is an associate professor in the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences at the University of Texas Medical Branch Galveston. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at UTMB under the direction of Ken Ottenbacher and is currently the PI on a NCMRR funded K01 Career Development Award. Dr. Reistetter’s research examines the regional variation in inpatient rehabilitation facilities.

Jason Beneciuk, PT, DPT, PhD, MPH, FAAOMPT is a research assistant professor with joint positions with Brooks Rehabilitation Clinical Research Center and the Department of Physical Therapy at the University of Florida. His research interests are focused on: 1) psychosocial screening for patients with musculoskeletal pain in outpatient physical therapy settings, 2) mechanisms of manual therapy, and 3) the prevalence and prognostic factors of musculoskeletal pain in outpatient physical therapy settings.

James Graham, PhD is an associate professor in the Division of Rehabilitation Sciences within the School of Health Professions and a Fellow in the Sealy Center on Aging at UTMB. He received a PhD in Rehabilitation Science from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He completed a postdoctoral fellowship at UTMB under the direction of Ken Ottenbacher. Dr. Graham’s research examines the hierarchy of health determinants and how attributes from these different levels (i.e. person-level, provider-level, and healthcare system-level) influence the long-term health and functional independence of older adults with chronic health conditions. He has investigated these relationships through both clinical research and secondary analysis of administrative and assessment medical records. He is currently PI on an R03 (NIH) grant and is author or coauthor of 43 articles in peer-reviewed journals

Barbara Gage, PhD is the Sr. VP, Scientific Research and Development, Post Acute Care Center for Research, Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at the Brookings Insitute. Dr. Gage is a national expert in Medicare Post Acute Care policy issues, including bundled payments, episodes of care, and case-mix research. She has directed numerous studies analyzing the impact of Medicare post-acute payment policy changes, including the Congressionally mandated Medicare Post Acute Care Payment Reform Demonstration (PAC PRD) and the Development of the Standardized CARE Item Set. Dr. Gage's research has included numerous studies of the relative use of PAC before and after the Balanced Budget Act, case-mix analysis of long-term care hospital, rehabilitation hospital, skilled nursing facility, home health, and outpatient therapy patients, relative use of inpatient and ambulatory rehabilitation services, bundled post-acute payment demonstrations, and the development of items to monitor the impact of the Medicare payment systems on access and quality of care.

 

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